Friday, February 12, 2016

Rhythm and Roots: Dance in American Art


Detroit Institute of Arts March 20-June 12, 2016

Denver Art Museum  July 10–Oct. 2, 2016
Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art in Arkansas October 22, 2016-January 16, 2017

Rhythm and Roots: Dance in American Art will present how artists, dancers and choreographers helped form the artistic identity of dance in America. The exhibition will feature about 90 paintings, photographs, sculptures and costumes relating to American dance from 1830 to 1960.



Rhythm and Roots: Dance in American Art will showcase works by American artists from the 19th and 20th centuries, focused on addressing the first influences in American dance, how it evolved over time and how the distinct traditions of American dance came to be. The exhibition will also use objects to demonstrate the dialog between visual artists, dancers and choreographers. Multi-media features such as video, music and interactive spaces will bring to life the dynamic spectacle of motion and performance through art.

Rhythm and Roots: Dance in American Art introduces how dance evolves from the private sphere to the public stage, showcasing new American dances and dance in the club.

The exhibition brings together the greatest nineteenth-century American artists including John Singer Sargent, Winslow Homer, and Mary Cassatt; spotlights the superstars of the Harlem Renaissance including Aaron Douglas, William Johnson, and James Van Der Zee and features the artists who shaped the aesthetics of modern dance including Isamu Noguchi, Jasper Johns, and Andy Warhol.  
The exhibition includes 19th-century paintings that portray dances from America’s diverse communities, from the sacred dances of indigenous North Americans to Irish jigs and Spanish flamencos; paintings that show class distinctions, from the refined quadrille to a sidewalk tarantella; pastoral fantasies of expressive dances performed outdoors; paintings from the turn of the 20th century featuring international female superstars; works by Harlem Renaissance artists who challenged negative stereotypes and sought to create and sustain a vibrant cultural identity; and modern objects that demonstrate a fluid dialogue between visual artists, dancers and choreographers.
- See more at: http://www.dia.org/calendar/exhibition.aspx?id=5396&iid=#sthash.76BMEUJM.dpuf
The exhibition explores the concept of the stage through artists’ historic fascination with and depiction of performers. Pieces featuring iconic American dancers such as Isadora Duncan, Katherine Dunham, Fred Astaire and Josephine Baker are included in the exhibition, as well as Spanish dancer Carmencita Dauset Moreno and Russian ballerina Anna Pavlova painted by American artists.

The exhibition brings together the greatest nineteenth-century American artists including John Singer Sargent, Winslow Homer, and Mary Cassatt; spotlights the superstars of the Harlem Renaissance including Aaron Douglas, William Johnson, and James Van Der Zee and features the artists who shaped the aesthetics of modern dance including Isamu Noguchi, Jasper Johns, and Andy Warhol.  
The exhibition includes 19th-century paintings that portray dances from America’s diverse communities, from the sacred dances of indigenous North Americans to Irish jigs and Spanish flamencos; paintings that show class distinctions, from the refined quadrille to a sidewalk tarantella; pastoral fantasies of expressive dances performed outdoors; paintings from the turn of the 20th century featuring international female superstars; works by Harlem Renaissance artists who challenged negative stereotypes and sought to create and sustain a vibrant cultural identity; and modern objects that demonstrate a fluid dialogue between visual artists, dancers and choreographers.
- See more at: http://www.dia.org/calendar/exhibition.aspx?id=5396&iid=#sthash.76BMEUJM.dpuf
The exhibition concludes with the convergence of artistry between visual artists and dancers where individuals like Diego Rivera and Andy Warhol collaborated with dance companies such as the American Ballet.

“The relationship between two forms of creative expression, dance and art, and the boundless commotion of rhythm and movement is captured through this dance exhibition,” said Daneo. “The artists’ ability to capture fleeting moments through a painting or a sculpture and their fascination with this subject will show how dance as an art form was and still is a vital part of American life and a constant source of inspiration.”

Rhythm and Roots: Dance in American Art has been organized by the Detroit Institute of Arts.





John Singer Sargent, 1890, oil on canvas. Paris, musée d'Orsay. RF7 46


Joseph Henry Sharp, 1893-1894, oil on canvas. Cincinnati Art Museum, Museum Purchase, 1894.10


John Singer Sargent, 1878, oil on canvas. Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art, Bentonville, Arkansas



Robert Cozad Henri, 1919, oil on canvas. Gift of the Sameric Corporation in memory of Eric Shapiro


Salome Dancer

Robert Cozad Henri, 1909, oil on canvas. Mead Art Museum, Amherst College, Museum Purchase,1973.6


The Bear Dance

Willliam Holbrook Beard, ca. 1870, oil on linen. Courtesy of The New-York Historical Society, Gift of Enoch G. Megrue, 1942.108


Arthur Frank Mathews, ca. 1917, oil on canvas. Collection of the Oakland Museum of California, Gift of Concours d'Antiques, the Art Guild. A66.196.24


Everett Shinn, 1943, oil on canvas. The Westmoreland Museum of American Art, Greensburg, PA ,Gift of the William A. Coulter Fund. 1958.35


William Sidney Mount, 1845, oil on canvas mounted on wood. The Long Island Museum of American Art, History &Carriages. Gift of Mr. and Mrs. Ward Melville, 1950


Frank Myers, 1926, oil on canvas. The Irvine Museum


William H. Johnson, ca. 1941, oil on paperboard. Smithsonian American Art Museum, Gift of the Harmon Foundation. 1967.59.611


William Merritt Chase, 1890, oil on canvas. The Metropolitan Museum of Art, Gift of Sir William Van Horne. 1906.06.969


George Catlin Mandan O-kee-pa Ceremony, 1832, oil on canvas. Smithsonian American Art Museum, Gift of Mrs. Joseph Harrison, Jr., 1985.66.505


Thomas Cowperthwaite Eakins, 1877, oil on canvas. National Gallery of Art, Washington, Collection of Mr. and Mrs. Paul Mellon, 1985.64.16


George Caleb Bingham, 1846, oil on canvas. National Gallery of Art, Washington. Patrons' Permanent Fund. 2015.18.1


Thursday, February 11, 2016

Van Gogh’s Bedrooms



Van Gogh’s Bedrooms Features Thirty-six Paintings, Drawings, and Illustrated Letters by the Artist Accompanied by an Interactive Digital Experience

Vincent van Gogh’s painting of his bedroom in Arles is arguably the most famous chambre in the history of art. So important was this composition that Van Gogh made three distinct versions and considered it his finest painting. Now, for the first time in North America, all three versions of the painting will be together in an exhibition titled Van Gogh’s Bedrooms at the Art Institute of Chicago.

Opening on February 14, 2016, the exhibition is the first ever dedicated to the Bedroom paintings,
presenting an in-depth study of documentary, scientific, and physical evidence pertaining to all three versions. Beginning with Van Gogh’s early canvases of cottages and birds’ nests, the show explores the artist’s use of the motif of home as a haven, creative chamber, and physical reality. 


Enhancing the exploration of the artist’s artworks and his longing for a place of his own are several engaging interactive technologies designed in partnership with Bluecadet. 

A digitally enhanced reconstruction of his bedroom allows visitors the chance to experience the physical reality of the space that so inspired him, while other enriching digital components bring to light significant recent scientific research on the three Bedroom paintings. 

An illustrated exhibition catalog with a lead essay from Gloria Groom, Chair of European Painting and Sculpture and David and Mary Winton Green Curator, will be published by the Art Institute of Chicago in partnership with Yale University Press. 


Vincent van Gogh. The Bedroom. 1889. The Art Institute of Chicago, Helen Birch Bartlett Memorial Collection.





Vincent van Gogh. Self–Portrait. 1887. The Art Institute of Chicago, Joseph Winterbotham Collection.




Vincent van Gogh. The Bedroom, 1889. Musée d'Orsay, Paris, sold to national museums under the Treaty of Peace with Japan, 1959.





Vincent van Gogh. The Bedroom, 1888. Van Gogh Museum, Amsterdam (Vincent van Gogh Foundation).


Vincent van Gogh. Eugène Boch. 1888. Musée d'Orsay, Paris, legacy of Mr. Eugène Boch, 1941.


Vincent van Gogh. Gauguin’s Chair. 1888. Van Gogh Museum, Amsterdam (Vincent van Gogh Foundation).




Vincent van Gogh. The Lover (Portrait of Lieutenant Milliet). Late September-early October 1888. KM 102.392. Kröller–Müller Museum, Otterlo, The Netherlands.




Vincent van Gogh. Van Gogh's Chair, 1888. The National Gallery, London, Bought, Courtauld Fund, 1924.





Vincent van Gogh. A Pair of Boots. 1887. The Baltimore Museum of Art, The Cone Collection, formed by Dr. Claribel Cone and Miss Etta Cone of Baltimore, Maryland, BMA, 1950.302. Photography by: Mitro Hood.




Vincent van Gogh. Parisian Novels. 1887. Private Collection.


Vincent van Gogh. The Poet’s Garden. 1888. The Art Institute of Chicago, Mr. and Mrs. Lewis Larned Coburn Memorial Collection.


Vincent van Gogh. Madame Roulin Rocking the Cradle (La Berceuse) 1889. The Art Institute of Chicago, Helen Birch Bartlett Memorial Collection.



Vincent van Gogh. Corridor in the Asylum. 1889. The Metropolitan Museum of Art, Bequest of Abby Aldrich Rockefeller, 1948.




Vincent van Gogh. Thatched–Roofed Cottages of Jorgus. 1890. Private Collection.




Vincent van Gogh. Self–Portrait. 1889. National Gallery of Art, Washington, Collection of Mr. and Mrs. John Hay Whitney.

Francis Picabia at Auction

Sotheby's 2016




Francis Picabia Ventilateur (circa1918) Estimate: £1,800,000-2,500,000

An exceptional example of Picabia’s rare and profoundly influential machinist compositions from his Dada period, in this work a ventilation machine is depicted as analogous with a potent female sexuality. The use of mechanical forms and the sensational associations they evoke were fundamental to the artist’s perception of art’s role in the modern, industrialised epoch.

Sotheby’s Surrealist Art Evening Sale 3rd February 2015






Francis Picabia
Lunaris
Oil, brush and ink and black crayon on panel 120 by 94.5cm; 471⁄4 by 371⁄4in.
Painted circa 1929
Est. £800,000 – 1.2 million 



Painted circa 1929, Lunaris is an exceptional example of Picabia's celebrated ‘Transparence’ paintings that Picabia executed in the late 1920s and early 1930s. This series of works, which was a marked departure from the artist’s Dadist experiments of the previous decades, derived its name from the multiple layers of overlapping imagery that Picabia employed and is characterised by figurative images underpinned by a Classical beauty. 

The first owner of the present work was the influential French art dealer Léonce Rosenberg (1879-1947) who greatly admired Picabia’s work and commissioned several paintings for his home. 

As the Museum of Modern Art, New York announced a major Picabia retrospective, scheduled for November 2016, the sale will present two other ‘Transparence’ paintings, including  

 
 Lunis, also from circa 1929, (est. £800,000- 1,200,000) 





and Espagnole et Agneau de l'Apocalypse, from circa 1927-1928 (est. £160,000-200,000).
 

Christie’s London 2015: The Art of the Surreal Evening Sale





Mid-Lent (Mi-Carême), painted in 1925, by Francis Picabia is one of the very few works from the artist’s important ‘Monsters’ series to remain in private hands (estimate: £1-1.5 million. It has been requested for inclusion in an exhibition at The Museum of Modern Art, New York, June 2016 to April 2017. In the winter of 1924-5 Picabia began a series of paintings that deliberately ridiculed the rich socialites who celebrated carnival in Cannes during the winter season. Executed in the cheap brand of household enamel paint known as Ripolin, these paintings, famously dubbed by his friend and colleague Marcel Duchamp as the ‘Monsters’, were based on scenes from the masked balls of Cannes which were especially decadent and lavish at this time. The present canvas is one of the finest of this anti-art, anti-modernist and anti-classical series of paintings that epitomise Picabia’s unique and fiercely individualistic stance towards both life and art. His deliberately iconoclastic approach to painting and the carnival-like gaudiness of his technique were part of a radical and ground-breaking anti-modernist aesthetic that, though revolutionary and shocking in the 1920s, was to have a significant influence on many post-modernist approaches to painting in the 1970s and ‘80s, particularly upon the work of Sigmar Polke. Similarly, Picabia’s adoption of Ripolin and the free-flowing liberty this paint lent his work not only influenced Picasso, who used Ripolin from 1925 through to the end of his life, but can also can be seen to anticipate Jackson Pollock’s similar free-form use of the medium in the 1940s.

Christie's 2015





PRICE REALIZED

$701,000



PRICE REALIZED
€577,500

Christie's 2014



PRICE REALIZED
€373,500

Christie's 2013





PRICE REALIZED

£457,250



PRICE REALIZED
£349,875
 
Christie's 2012





PRICE REALIZED

£1,833,250

Christie's 2010



£601,250

Christie's 2009



PRICE REALIZED
£385,250

Christie's 2008



PRICE REALIZED
£1,364,500



PRICE REALIZED
£246,500



Sotheby's 2015




LOT SOLD. 370,000 USD




LOT SOLD. 514,000 USD



LOT SOLD. 175,000 USD

Sotheby's 2014



Estimate 180,000250,000 USD




Estimate 250,000 — 350,000 USD



Estimate
400,000600,000
USD